Alcoholics Can Recover from Alcoholism with Proper Rehabilitation Program

The fully recovered individuals show symptoms of neither alcohol dependence nor alcohol abuse. They either abstain or drink at levels below those known to increase relapse risk. They include roughly equal proportions of abstainers (18.2 percent) and low-risk drinkers (17.7 percent).

The analysis is based on data from the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a project of NIAAA. Based on a representative sample of 43,000 U.S. adults aged 18 years and older, the NESARC is the largest survey ever conducted of the co-occurrence of alcohol and drug use disorders and related psychiatric conditions. The NESARC defines alcohol use disorders and their remission according to the most recent clinical criteria established by the American Psychiatric Association.

One-quarter (25.0 percent) of individuals with alcohol dependence that began more than one year ago now are still dependent and 27.3 percent are in partial remission (that is, exhibit some symptoms of alcohol dependence or alcohol abuse). About twelve percent (11.8%) are drinkers with no symptoms but whose consumption increases their chances of relapse (for men, more than 14 drinks per week or more than four drinks on any day; for women, more than 7 drinks per week or more than three drinks on any day).

Lead author Deborah Dawson, Ph.D. and her colleagues in the Laboratory of Biometry and Epidemiology in NIAAA’s intramural research program released the latest NESARC analysis in an article in Addiction entitled “Recovery From DSM-IV Alcohol Dependence: United States, 2001-2002.”

Research has produced evidence for decades that some alcoholics could return to moderate or controlled drinking. However, Alcoholics Anonymous and other influential and powerful groups have tended to define an alcoholic as a person who can never drink in moderation. Thus, their conceptions and definitions have caused them to reject this mounting evidence. For example, they tend to argue that if researchers identify alcoholics who can now drink in moderation, that simply means that the alcoholics were falsely diagnosed and really weren’t alcoholics or they wouldn’t have been able to drink in moderation.

Brady Grainier, Chief Operating Officer at addiction treatment company BioCorRx, Inc. (BICX) echoed the findings of the study.

He mentioned that his firm’s Start Fresh Program provides rehabilitation treatment for alcohol and opioid addiction. The program, which uses a dual approach of medication and one-on-one life coaching, is now being used in many alcohol and drug addiction clinics in the U.S.

“Our goal is to increase those recovery numbers in the years to come. The clinics using our program are reporting very high sobriety rates at the one year anniversary from the program start dates of their respective patients,” said Granier.

The Start Fresh Program is a two-tiered program used by local addiction clinics across the United States which involves an outpatient medical procedure and psycho-social coaching.
The program’s first component involves an outpatient medical procedure to embed BioCorRx’s biodegradable naltrexone implant under the abdominal skin and fatty tissue. The implant then delivers therapeutic levels of the antagonist drug, naltrexone, into the bloodstream which can curb one’s cravings for alcohol or opioids. The program is administered on an out-patient basis over an average of 6-8 months and can be done without the need to miss more than one day of work in most cases.
Learn more information about the Start Fresh Program from BioCorRx, Inc. by visiting its website www.BICXcorp.com.
Those seeking help for mental and/or substance use disorders have many resources to turn to for help. For example, SAMHSA’s Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator: http://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/ or 1-800 662 HELP (4357) can provide immediate round-the-clock information on treatment programs for mental and/or substance use disorders throughout the nation.

Those seeking help for mental and/or substance use disorders have many resources to turn to for help. For example, SAMHSA’s Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator: http://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/ or 1-800 662 HELP (4357) can provide immediate round-the-clock information on treatment programs for mental and/or substance use disorders throughout the nation.

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